Fort Collins Heating & Air Conditioning Blog

Category: Heat Pumps

In Colorado towns like Wellington, heat pumps and hybrid systems (which use a heat pump and a smaller gas or electric furnace) make an attractive alternative to more traditional heating systems. Heat pumps combine the functions of a heater and an air conditioner into one. Because they’re based on the same technology as air conditioners, heat pumps can experience the same kinds of problems. For example, you might be asking yourself “why is my heat pump leaking water?

The answers are similar to the ones you find with an air conditioner and can include:

  • Ice on the coils. When refrigerant levels are lower than they should be in the system, it can create ice on the evaporator coils. This is problematic because it restricts the cooling process, which impacts the heat pump’s ability to function. (In a heat pump, the outside coils serve as evaporators in the winter and the inside coils do the same job in the summer.) When the ice melts, it can create puddles of water that might leak.
  • Overflow pan or drain problems. Most heat pumps have a condensate pan to collect condensation in the unit and remove it via a drain line. If the drain line gets clogged or the condensate pan is set improperly, the water will run over and cause a leak. This is especially true if the coils get dirty, since the dirt will mix with the condensate and exacerbate any clogs.

Regardless of the cause, if the heat pump is leaking water it needs to be turned off immediately and a repairman called in to fix the issue. In the event of ice formation, he or she can seal the leak and recharge the refrigerant levels. If the problem is in the drain pan, he or she can clear the clogs and/or rest the pan so that it can drain at an appreciable rate. Here in Wellington, heat pumps can be serviced by the experts at Fort Collins Heating & Air Conditioning. We can determine why your heat pump is leaking water, then perform repair operations with speed and efficiency. Pick up the phone and give us a call today!

Twitter

When it comes to the question of having any kind of heating system installed in your house, the initial answer is usually, “Maybe.” Regardless of the advantages a particular type of heater can offer you during a Colorado winter, there is no “one size fits all” solution. Each home has unique requirements for heating and cooling it. Local weather, humidity, power sources, and even elevation can affect how well an HVAC system works for a home.

With that caveat out of the way, let’s look at the heat pump, one of the most popular options for solving indoor comfort needs. For more information on our Loveland, CO heat pump services, contact the professionals at Fort Collins Heating & Air Conditioning.

A heat pump works as an air conditioner that can reverse the direction of heat exchange so it acts as a heater when necessary. A standard AC uses refrigerant to move heat from your home and release it outside. A heat pump uses a reversing valve and second compressor to change over and move heat from outside into your home. Unlike furnaces and boilers, which use up large amounts of fuel to run—whether electricity, natural gas, or another source—heat pumps only need a small amount of electricity to run, which makes them highly efficient.

There are also geothermal heat pump systems available, which draw heat right from the ground (or place it into the ground).

However, heat pumps have the drawback that they are not as efficient at heating as they are at cooling. They may work well for you during a hot summer, but in extreme cold temperatures in homes with poor insulation, a heat pump can struggle to get you the best comfort. Geothermal systems are also unsuitable for many homes because of the extensive installation requirements.

The best way to answer the question, “Should I get a heat pump in my home?” with anything stronger than, “Maybe,” is to have professionals do a heat load calculation to determine your house’s specific needs. This complex calculation takes into account numerous factors in your home to come up with a focused idea on what kind of heater will do the best job. Get an experienced HVAC company to do a heat load calculation, and listen to their advice on whether a heat pump is the right choice for your home.

Fort Collins Heating & Air Conditioning offers heat pump and geothermal heat pump installation, as well as repairs and maintenance. Our decades of experience can help you in Loveland, CO when a heat pump starts looking like a good option.

Twitter

If you are looking for a great way to heat and cool your home in a more efficient manner, a heat pump is certainly an option worthy of your consideration. Thanks to their unique design, heat pumps are able to keep your home comfortable all year long with much greater efficiency than many more traditional heating and cooling systems. Of course, this is not to imply that you can blindly purchase any heat pump and expect to get an outstanding performance from it. There are some factors to consider, such as the efficiency rating of the heat pump in question. Here are some tips about deciphering heat pump efficiency ratings from the Fort Collins, CO heat pump pros at Fort Collins Heating & Air Conditioning.

Like other air conditioning systems, the efficiency with which an air-source heat pump cools your home is measured with a SEER (seasonal energy efficiency ratio). This is indicative of the amount of heat removed throughout the cooling season, measured in Btu (British thermal unit) divided by the amount of electricity consumed by the heat pump throughout this time frame. This amount is measured in watt-hours.

The higher the SEER, the more efficiently your heat pump will operate. It is a good idea to discuss your options with a qualified heat pump technician and to invest in the system with highest SEER your budget can accommodate. Our team can help you find the right heat pump to keep your home cool all summer.

Of course, heat pumps are also an exceptional way to keep comfortable during the heating season. The HSPF (heating season performance factor) indicates how efficiently a heat pump will heat your home. This the amount, in Btu, of space heating required throughout the heating season divided by the amount of electricity consumed by the system (again represented in Btu). For truly outstanding efficiency, look for a heat pump with a SEER in the 14-18 range and an HSPF of 8-10.

If you are interested in learning more about how you can get the most efficient performance possible from your heat pump, contact Fort Collins Heating & Air Conditioning today. We’ll make sure that you have the information you need to fully understand the efficiency ratings of your heat pump options. Our Fort Collins, CO heat pump professionals are always happy to answer any questions you may have.

Twitter

Fort Collins Heating & Air Conditioning Blog

Search

Archive

Archive

Categories

Categories

Tags